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Council OKs second reading ordinance

PRINCETON — Princeton residents will now have an additional chance to review ordinances before they are adopted by the Princeton City Council.

At Monday’s meeting, the Princeton City Council adopted an ordinance which would require two readings of any proposed ordinance at two separate meetings before the council could take action on the ordinance. In case of an emergency, a four-fifths vote of the council can waive the two-reading rule, allowing the council to vote on the proposed ordinance at the first reading meeting.

Commissioner Joel Quiram had originally brought up the two-reading proposal in August, saying he believed requiring two readings would make it easier for the public to learn about an ordinance and to make known any concerns or questions they might have. The two readings would also be a way to promote transparency and trust with the public, he said.

Monday’s two-reading ordinance was adopted on a 4 to 1 vote with commissioner Bob Warren casting the no vote.

After Monday’s meeting, Warren said he voted against the ordinance because he thinks it’s unnecessary and will just bog down the work of government. Plus, he didn’t think the two readings of an ordinance would do anything to promote pubic involvement and transparency.

Princeton residents can attend all council meetings and ask their questions at that time but very few people do, Warren said.

“Two readings of an ordinance is not going to do anything for transparency. All it’s going to do is slow down the process,” Warren said. “Government is not a spectator sport, and this does nothing to change that.”

In other business at Monday’s meeting, Princeton Police Chief Tom Root presented Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board certificates to Officers Kendra Bierbom and Jacob Foster for their recent completion of training courses.

Root said Bierbom recently completed a nearly 11-week training course through the Cook County Sheriff’s Academy. Foster, who had already completed the 400-hour training academy, recently completed an 80-hour transition course, giving him the required 480 hours of training required to be a full-time officer in Illinois, Root said.

Also at Monday’s meeting, Princeton resident Al Davidson presented the council with a “Princeton, Illinois” wooden sign which can be displayed at City Hall.

Also, Mayor Keith Cain announced Halloween trick-or-treat hours will be 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Oct. 31 for Princeton.

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