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Headlines from the past

OK folks. As my research progresses through the years, so do those headlines that graced past issues of our local newspapers. These entries are all from the Bureau County Record 1909. Here we go again with some more Headlines From The Past.

March 31, 1909: Miss Nina A. Pattee, a teacher in Marseilles, is arrested for sending obscene letters. Recipients of these letters include President William Howard Taft, former President Theodore Roosevelt, Gov. Charles Deneen and a number of high-ranking Chicago officials. Pattee was interviewed by a Record reporter while in a detention hospital and declared she was not insane. Then to prove her state of mind, she went into a trance and stated the reporter must seek a woman named Mary Brand at 22 Delaware Place. After returning from her trance, Pattee revealed she had been visited by God on St. Valentine’s Day 1903. It was later disclosed Pattee had been struck in the head with a baseball bat by a student and that surgery would correct her problem.

June 30, 1909: Miss Dora Leddy filed suit against the Spring Valley Board of Education. The board had dismissed her from her duties when she refused to take back a student, Nelly Walker, whom she had sent home from school. Leddy refused to take the student back until the student apologized. Details were not given why. Leddy eventually sued the board for back pay in which she was granted. She dropped her other suits when awarded the pay in the amount of $50 per month.

June 30, 1909: “Reckless Motorcyclist.” The motorcycle craze hit Princeton and produced some reckless driving. According to the report, these drivers take little care on busy streets or sidewalks in the city as they race along at speeds up to 45 miles an hour. Complaints have been received from all over Princeton. More than one case has been recorded of children’s narrow escape due to these reckless drivers. Also included in this issue of the Record is an article about riding bikes on the sidewalks. It is against city ordinance to ride a bike on the sidewalks. Youths are the biggest offenders, and it has been reported these wheelmen even conduct races on city sidewalks. Parents are asked to remind their children of the laws and consequences of their actions. The article states, “Due warning has been given, and the next step is likely to be the appearance of an officer with warrants for the offenders.”

October 6, 1909: “Don’t Know He’s Married.” Glenn Wyatt of Wyanet was not present at his own wedding. Wyatt and Miss Frances Roose were married quietly in Ottawa on Oct. 4, but the groom was not there. When interviewed, Wyatt knew nothing about the marriage. Relatives of Miss Roose living in Princeton stated they weren’t certain if the marriage had occurred but were not surprised to hear of it. Wyatt was employed by the H.W. Cate Co. in Wyanet. The article concluded by saying “perhaps he is going to keep it a secret, so please do not say anything about it.”

Sept. 1, 1909: “Spring Valley Under Ban.” No more prize fights are to be conducted in Spring Valley is the message from the Illinois Governor’s Office. Bureau County Sheriff O.H. Skoglund received a communications from acting governor Oglesby stating “take the necessary means to prevent any violations of the law.”

So there you have it. Another entry into Headlines From The Past. Have a great day!

Princeton resident Todd Borsch can be reached at borsch3@ivnet.com.

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