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Lauritzen covering all the bases

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(BCR photo/Goldie Currie)
Max Lauritzen

PRINCETON –  Max Lauritzen of Princeton has devoted 40 years of his life to Little League baseball.

He is one of the few who have experienced the program from all angles, whether it was through coaching, umpiring, directing, serving as a board member or being the longtime assistant director administrator for District 20, Lauritzen has seen it all.

“I just kept on going and going,” he said. “I enjoy every minute of it. I enjoy the kids. The kid are the only part, the heck with parents,” he said. “Baseball would be a great time if it weren’t for the parents.”

The game has always held a special place in Lauritzen’s heart. He remembers being a kid and gathering with friends for a good game.

“Back then you didn’t have to be good; everybody had a chance to play,” he said. “I remember living at one end of town, getting on my bike with a bag of ball and bats and you’d play with whoever was down there,” he said. “You don’t do that anymore that much.”

The way Lauritzen sees it, kids learn more than just the sport when participating in Little League.

“They learn the respect of others, to respect authority, self confidence, safety ... It’s just a good program,” he said.

In 2010, Lauritzen got the surprise of his life when he attended the Little League International Congress in Lexington, Ky. During the convention, he was honored with a glass bat award and was recognized for his numerous years of volunteer service to District 20.

Little League is divided into nine regions around the world with a total of 650 district administrators and more than a thousand assistants. To receive an award only eight others in the world received that year and to shake the hand of Steve Keener, Little League CEO/president, made every second Lauritzen gave to Little League truly worth it.

Today, Lauritzen doesn’t get out to the ball diamond as much, but he continues to be a prominent part of District 20. He currently is in charge of four Little League websites, which he continuously keeps updated with schedules, team information, scores and tournament brackets.

During Little League season, he most likely can be found at his computer in his office updating scores. During season time, he’s known to spend anywhere from 10 to 15 hours a day, working on the websites. When the last Little League tournament of the season is finished in August, Lauritzen is spending the next day preparing for next season.

“It’s all for the kids,” he said. “When the season is all over, I’m rejuvenated and ready to go another year.”

Lauritzen can still be seen at a meeting or game here or there, but for the most part he doesn’t do much traveling on his own anymore.

“I owe it all to my wife and family for letting me do this and taking the time do to it all,” he said.

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