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Hole-y cow! Potholes abound!

Published: Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 3:14 p.m. CST • Updated: Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2014 3:18 p.m. CST

PRINCETON —There’s not much that can be done right now about the potholes on the streets of Princeton.

At Monday’s meeting of the Princeton City Council, Mayor Keith Cain said he knows there are a lot of potholes forming on the city streets due to the winter weather. Unfortunately, there will probably be more potholes before the winter is finished he said.

“As we all know, it’s been a rough winter,” the mayor said. “We are aware there’s a lot of potholes, but there really isn’t much we can do about that right now with the (weather) conditions we have.”

The mayor urged motorists to drive carefully and slowly, which they should be doing anyway, he said. Princeton isn’t the only municipality which is having a problem with potholes, Cain said.

The winter weather has also caused a delay in planned sewer project improvements. Hopefully, the snow will melt slowly, so the sewer lines can handle it, Cain said.

Also addressing the winter weather and snows, Commissioner Ray Mabry commended the street department, as well as the other departments assisting the street department, for their hard work in clearing the streets during this snowy winter. The street department’s new dump truck with attached plow has really helped with snow removal.

In other business, Commissioner Joel Quiram asked for an update on the city’s new water treatment plant, which he said is not up and running yet and is several months behind schedule.

Princeton City Manager Jeff Clawson said there are a couple small “nuisance” items which are being addressed, specifically in areas of software communication which is not working quite right yet. It’s minor, but until those issues are resolved, the city can’t make water and rely on the new plant for a day-to-day operations, Clawson said.

He met with Vissering Construction last week to discuss the final terms of the contract, and the city is still withholding a $300,000 payment until the minor communication issues are resolved, Clawson said.

On Tuesday, Clawson said the city will be making water in the new water treatment plant prior to taking the old plant completely out of service. The switchover will take some time, with the transition to be done slowly just as a precaution, he said.

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