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Agriculture

Farm Bureau Women celebrate Farm-City Week

Enough food to feed 155 people given to pantry

Members of the Bureau County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee and Young Leader Committee donated enough food to feed 155 people Thanksgiving dinner — representative of how many people one farmer feeds each year. Pictured are Bev Read (from left), Beth Schultz, Vanessa Hoffeditz, Bureau County Food Pantry/TriCounty Opportunities director, and Jill Frueh, Farm Bureau manager.
Members of the Bureau County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee and Young Leader Committee donated enough food to feed 155 people Thanksgiving dinner — representative of how many people one farmer feeds each year. Pictured are Bev Read (from left), Beth Schultz, Vanessa Hoffeditz, Bureau County Food Pantry/TriCounty Opportunities director, and Jill Frueh, Farm Bureau manager.

PRINCETON – In recognition of National Farm City Week, the Bureau County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee donated enough food to provide Thanksgiving dinner for 155 people.

This donation, which consisted of 22 turkeys, 30 cans of sweet potatoes, 26 cans of cranberry sauce, 20 boxes of instant potatoes, 26 packages of stuffing, 44 cans of green beans, 12 packages of rolls, 30 jars of apple sauce, 15 boxes of cake mix, and 15 cans of frosting, took place on Nov. 15 at the food pantry in Princeton.

Farm Bureau Women noted that since the nation’s earliest days, farmers have tilled the soil, feeding their families, other citizens and people around the world.

Over the years, the economy has changed, but American farms and ranches have remained a vital thread in the fabric of everyday life.

In fact, an average American farmer feeds 155 people each year.

The nation was founded on values of hard work, faith, family and community. Those values still hold true for farmers and ranchers. By providing an abundant supply of safe, high-quality food and fiber, farmers and ranchers contribute to a quality of life that is unmatched around the world.

Farmers do not work alone. Farm workers, researchers, educators, processors, shippers, truck drivers, inspectors, agribusinesses, wholesalers, marketers, retailers and consumers, many of whom are in urban and suburban areas, all play important roles in the incredible productivity of the nation’s food and fiber system.

During the holiday season, it is fitting that area residents count among their blessings the vital farm-city partnerships that have done so much to improve the overall quality of life.

Rural and urban communities working together have made the most of the nation’s rich agricultural resources, and they continue to contribute to the health and well-being of Americans and strengthen the economy.

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